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  #41  
Old 10-28-2014, 07:22 PM
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Chris
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That's nuts man!
Why would she not at least store them properly?
And why on earth would she not give them to you?
Chris

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Originally Posted by 1952boyntoncollector View Post
yes.i remember like 15 years ago i saw at least 2 boxes of 52' but didnt collect then but i knew about the mantle..breaks my heart...but if you understand i hope the day never comes when i able to go through whats there.
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  #42  
Old 10-29-2014, 12:37 AM
Collectorsince62 Collectorsince62 is offline
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I started collecting in 1962 but not heavily until 1964. My neighborhood was full of kids my age and living in St. Louis in the mid-60's made it hard not to be a baseball fan. We all bought wax packs and had massive trading sessions. Never flipped, just traded. Cardinals were more coveted than anything, but we all tried to get complete sets. I can still remember the euphoria of seeing the 1964 World Series cards from the '65 set. For many, many years the packs remained five cents each, but the Ben Franklin gave you six packs for a quarter. A full box was $1.03 but that was more than my allowance and returned bottle deposits could afford. We were well aware of each series, and the quest to find which local store had the new series was our version of chase cards. I guess because there were so many kids buying cards we never had any problem with high numbers. In 1967 though, the 6th series could not be found - anywhere. The 7th series was plentiful and we just kept buying them up hoping to find some 6th series cards. I had a ridiculous number of '67 high numbers but not a single 6th series. I ended up buying the 6th series a few years later from Larry Fritsch for five or six bucks.

Great thread - thanks to everyone who contributed.
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  #43  
Old 08-19-2018, 04:49 PM
carney22 carney22 is offline
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Default The best memories of summer . . .

Nearly four years since the last post, but this is a pretty timeless topic . . .

Collecting by series, for me, was what collecting was all about. It's what made it fun, and what made it a challenge. Remember, there was only one card company in the game, one major set each year, and the experience of collecting that set over the course of the season was both exhilarating and frustrating.

My first year as a collector was 1967 (so, not surprisingly, it ended up being my favorite set of all time). I was 10 that summer, and I had a mentor, another kid at school who'd been collecting for a couple of years and helped explain the concept of series . . . so unlike a lot of the posters here, I knew what that was all about.

Living in several different locations in the far south suburbs of Chicago over the course of my youth, I was always able to find a drug store or 5&10 that carried baseball cards; fortunately, the places I used as primary sources never seemed to have a problem with putting out the new series when they arrived, no matter how much of the previous series remained. But you never knew just when it was going to happen. It seemed like it was every three or four weeks, and in my area it always seemed to happen at the end of the week, a Thursday or a Friday. Inevitably, my thirst for the next series would mean I'd optimistically go looking for the new cards a week before they were released. You bought a pack and hoped it would be something you hadn't seen, but usually I'd go home disappointed, knowing I had another week or two to wait.

And remember, most kids in the '60s or '70s had a nickel or a dime or maybe a quarter in their pockets. A full box of cards could be bought for less than $2, but no one had $2. So it wasn't instant gratification. You'd open your packs, play the "got-'em-got-'em-need-'em-got-'em" game and then walk or bicycle home, until you could scrape up a few more coins. Each series took awhile to put together. But one of the cards in each series was the checklist for the next series, a tantalizing look at what was to come in a few weeks. Who would be on the rookie cards? What did the combo card titles mean? It was all a part of a six-month journey from one series to the next until . . . completion.

I did, at some point, understand that later series were less available than the first few, but what I never understood until years later was the concept of the double-printed card. It all made sense later, of course, but at the time, no one could understand why you got so many cards of one guy and no one could find a card of someone else.

In the summer of '67, I can remember buying pack after pack of fifth series cards before finally getting a Dave McNally. I remember doing the same with the sixth series, seeking a Juan Marichal, until after walking out of a local pharmacy following another fruitless purchase I ran into another kid who'd just gotten a Marichal in a pack he'd bought. I offered him everything in my hands for that card, and since he wasn't really a collector, he agreed. He probably would have just given it to me.

After suffering a 10-year-old's angst over completing those two late series, I mad a key decision: responding to an ad in Baseball Digest, I saved up a few dollars and ordered a complete set of the seventh series cards, from Bruce Yeko, one of the early mail-order dealers. Now, the 1967 seventh series is one of the legendary "hard-to-find" sets of the baby boomer era. I don't think I ever saw any seventh-series wax packs in my local stores (although I probably wasn't looking too hard). I completed my 1967 set, and still collect the annual Topps set to this day.

Would I have continued to be a collector if I'd suffered week after week of disappointment in trying to find seventh series cards at the drug store? That's a question I can't answer. From then on I did frequently lean on ordering sets from Yeko and, later, Renata Galasso . . . and yet I continued to buy wax packs. As a later-year boomer, those simple experiences always invoke the most blissful of summer memories.
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  #44  
Old 08-20-2018, 04:09 PM
stlcardsfan stlcardsfan is offline
D.an Jackso.n
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Great story! What a good call ordering that 7th series. What condition were / are those cards in?
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  #45  
Old 08-20-2018, 04:47 PM
Hot Springs Bathers Hot Springs Bathers is offline
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Growing up in Arkansas the stores carrying cards were few and far between although I must also say that in the late 50's and early 60's I didn't venture too far from my neighborhood.

About three blocks away I had the perfect store for a young boy, Mohr's Variety store. When you entered there were two isles, to the right was tropical fish and hamsters, to the left was candy and model airplanes and cars.

I never bought enough packs from 1959-61 to think about a set but in 1962 I was all in on baseball because of Mantle and Maris. I looked at my hoard when I got back into collecting in 1975 and found that I had not only no last series but no series two from 1962.

I continued to buy through 1965 on baseball but by 1962 most of us had turned out interest to football. After all we were in the south and had no pro teams close to us so we were huge college football fans. Buying football cards at least was football and the first thing we did was check the backs to see where they played college football. My last football purchases were in 1967 and that was just a few packs.

Besides Mohr's I had to small stores a block away in different directions, at one I bought a lot of 1960 Nu-Card football and later some Topps football and the other I bought 1962 and 1963 baseball. I can still remember walking up the street opening packs when I pulled my first Mantle, it was a 1962 All-Star.

By the way I put together a 1963 Fleer baseball set by feeding nickels into a vending machine at a laundromat close to my grade school. I think I stopped in to see what candy they had in the machine and found the Fleer packs.

I was a very lucky boy whose Mom never threw away a card or a toy.
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  #46  
Old 08-20-2018, 05:26 PM
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It's funny how you mention your mom didn't trash any of your cards. Man, were you lucky!! My house had a regular attic and then when an extension was eventually added (huge family), we had an additional, pretty large unfinished attic. A place so steeped in scratchy insulation (with a rickety, pull down access ladder), that our mom would never even think of venturing up there. When we knew the inevitable 'toss out' was on the horizon, my brothers and I found plywood boards that we laid across the bare rafters up there and created a remote island on which we stacked our boxes and boxes of cards, safely out of reach of the cardboard 'enemy.'
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  #47  
Old 08-20-2018, 05:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JollyElm View Post
It's funny how you mention your mom didn't trash any of your cards. Man, were you lucky!! My house had a regular attic and then when an extension was eventually added (huge family), we had an additional, pretty large unfinished attic. A place so steeped in scratchy insulation (with a rickety, pull down access ladder), that our mom would never even think of venturing up there. When we knew the inevitable 'toss out' was on the horizon, my brothers and I found plywood boards that we laid across the bare rafters up there and created a remote island on which we stacked our boxes and boxes of cards, safely out of reach of the cardboard 'enemy.'


Darren

Great story. I am curious about how well your cards survived their time in the attic.


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Complete:

1972 Topps Baseball
1973 Topps Baseball
1974 Topps Baseball (master set w/all variations)
1975 Topps Baseball

In progress:

1971 Topps Baseball
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  #48  
Old 08-20-2018, 06:10 PM
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Three of my peak years collecting were 1970-72. Living on Long Island, I was always able to find high numbers. I got most early series exclusively in Raks (at Coronet in Westbury which always had them early), the mid series in Raks and vending and cello's as I recall (as stores filled in their stock), then as the year wore on mostly wax as I often got 'em from the Colonial Maid Ice Cream Truck. Can't say I remember high number Raks in those years.

We used to vacation in Otis, MA for a week or two every summer and they often had wax up there but sometimes it was a couple series behind where were were on Long Island. And after 1973, which was not as a big a year for me, no more highs although I can't remember if I found "All 660" or not that year.

Last edited by toppcat; 08-20-2018 at 06:35 PM.
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  #49  
Old 08-20-2018, 06:11 PM
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We were never cognizant of 'value,' so most of them were already well-worn before they ever reached high altitude. Our innumerable piles of Topps cards were not affected a bit, but man, all of the Kellogg's cards we amassed and loved (a family of 5 boys meant a helluva lot of sugary cereal), became more curled up than the fries at Jack in the Box. To this day, I'm afraid of buying any Kellogg's 3-D cards, although the humidity is much more favorable out here in California than it ever was in New York.
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  #50  
Old 08-20-2018, 07:22 PM
MCoxon MCoxon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carney22 View Post
Nearly four years since the last post, but this is a pretty timeless topic . . .
This is the most amazing thing about this thread. So many great posts, from so many members whom I haven't seen post from in the 3 years since I've been on the board. And each one has a fascinating set of memories
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