NonSports Forum

Net54baseball.com
Welcome to Net54baseball.com. These forums are devoted to both Pre- and Post- war baseball cards and vintage memorabilia, as well as other sports. There is a separate section for Buying, Selling and Trading - the B/S/T area!! If you give an opinion of a person or company your full name needs to be in your post. Contact the moderator at leon@net54baseball.com should you have any questions or concerns. Enjoy!
Net54baseball.com
Net54baseball.com

Go Back   Net54baseball.com Forums > Net54baseball Postwar Sportscard Forums > Postwar Baseball Cards Forum (Pre-1980)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-11-2018, 07:58 PM
goudey1933's Avatar
goudey1933 goudey1933 is offline
scott altland
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: central PA
Posts: 228
Default When did the rookie card phenomena start

I started collecting cards as a kid around 1971.In those early years there wasn't a lot of talk about rookie cards...although at that time I was so young I may have missed it.Anybody remember around the time people really were giving a premium to those cards and did a certain player start the craze?
Scott

Last edited by goudey1933; 07-11-2018 at 07:58 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-11-2018, 08:39 PM
spec spec is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 198
Default

Joe Charboneau 1980?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-11-2018, 09:01 PM
vintagebaseballcardguy's Avatar
vintagebaseballcardguy vintagebaseballcardguy is offline
R0b3rt Ch!ld3rs
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,551
Default

I remember being a kid in the mid 1980s and starting to hear about the importance of rookies like those found in the 1984 Fleer Update set, the 1985 Topps Mark McGwire Olympic rookie, the 1984 Donruss Don Mattingly rookie, etc. Not sure if the rookie emphasis started just then or if it was simply a matter of my becoming old enough to begin knowing and understanding.

Either way, it's a shame. While there are undoubtedly some rookie cards out there which are aestically pleasing, there are many which just aren't all that great and collectors would otherwise prefer not spending big rookie $$ in favor of another card of the player, but they "can't" because just gotta have that rookie. Pete Rose springs to mind. I would guess 98 out of 100 sober collectors would choose his 1964 Topps card over the 1963 floating head Topps rookie.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-11-2018, 09:02 PM
swarmee's Avatar
swarmee swarmee is offline
J0hn Raff3rty
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Niceville FL
Posts: 2,842
Default

Don Mattingly 1984 was where the rookie card phenomenon was cemented, as far as I know.
__________________
--
Current Want to Buy/Trade for List:
1930s Phoebe Phelps Caramel Pennant of Georgia Tech
1910 Painted handkerchief of GA Tech pennant girl by F. Earl Christy sold by Atlanta Toy Museum on eBay circa 2000.
COMC store: https://www.comc.com/Users/mjohnatgt,sh,i100
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-11-2018, 09:13 PM
gonzo gonzo is online now
Michael G0nz@lez
member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 105
Default Beckett and Fernandomania

My recollections as a collecter starting at the end of the 70s:

The first Beckett guide coming out in 1979 boosted older rookie cards, since now even beginning collectors knew which cards they were. But the first rookie card I remember being a big deal during the player’s rookie year was Fernando Valenzuela in 1981. Before that, I don’t remember even older rookie cards having a huge premium, outside their age and the desirability of certain sets.

I remember that, collecting in 1980, I felt kind of cheated when I got a multiplayer rookie card. But in 1981, the Topps Traded sets came out, providing full-card versions of Valenzuela and Raines. The trend continued, with the big year-of rookies that I remember being Ripken in ‘82, Boggs and Strawberry in ‘83, and especially Gooden and Mattingly in ‘84. (I don’t remember Gwynn or Sandburg being as big a deal during their rookie years, but that may just be due to the circle I collected in.) As rookie cards increased in value, demand rose for rookies of other active stars like Brett, Henderson, and so forth. Pete Rose took off big time as he passed Musial for the NL hit record in 1981 and continued his pursuit of Ty Cobb.

By 1984, it was all about the rookies. Beckett Monthly let people track card values as if they were stocks, and some folks were imagining that their stash of Mattinglys would someday put Junior through college.
__________________
WTB/WTTF: (larger want/trade list here)
• T205s: rare backs and freaks, especially miscut with identifiable parts of both cards visible
• Christy Mathewson: T332 Helmar Stamp

See the Want List for "Successful net54 transactions" list.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-11-2018, 09:25 PM
Fetamore Fetamore is offline
Jim Harkins
member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Easton Pa
Posts: 18
Default

1981 Topps Fernando Valenzuela. Demand for a card has never topped this one.
Although the 1982 Topps Kent Hrbek is a close second.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-11-2018, 11:27 PM
rats60's Avatar
rats60 rats60 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,381
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzo View Post
My recollections as a collecter starting at the end of the 70s:

The first Beckett guide coming out in 1979 boosted older rookie cards, since now even beginning collectors knew which cards they were. But the first rookie card I remember being a big deal during the player’s rookie year was Fernando Valenzuela in 1981. Before that, I don’t remember even older rookie cards having a huge premium, outside their age and the desirability of certain sets.

I remember that, collecting in 1980, I felt kind of cheated when I got a multiplayer rookie card. But in 1981, the Topps Traded sets came out, providing full-card versions of Valenzuela and Raines. The trend continued, with the big year-of rookies that I remember being Ripken in ‘82, Boggs and Strawberry in ‘83, and especially Gooden and Mattingly in ‘84. (I don’t remember Gwynn or Sandburg being as big a deal during their rookie years, but that may just be due to the circle I collected in.) As rookie cards increased in value, demand rose for rookies of other active stars like Brett, Henderson, and so forth. Pete Rose took off big time as he passed Musial for the NL hit record in 1981 and continued his pursuit of Ty Cobb.

By 1984, it was all about the rookies. Beckett Monthly let people track card values as if they were stocks, and some folks were imagining that their stash of Mattinglys would someday put Junior through college.
These are my recollections too. Joe Charbaneau cards were hot at the beginning of 1981 coming off his ROY season. That was the first year there was real interest in a new card because it was a "rookie card." Gwynn and Sandberg became a big deal in 1984. By then people were prospecting, buying up rookie cards of players hoping they would hit it big and they could make a quick buck.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-12-2018, 01:47 AM
ls7plus ls7plus is offline
Larry
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Southfield, Michigan
Posts: 1,646
Default

'80's, and came into full bloom before the bust in the early '90's. No surprise it's with us again. Collectors simply like to have cards of the current players they root for and enjoy watching. It comes down to having a piece of the action!

Best wishes,

Larry
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-12-2018, 04:16 AM
that T206 Guy's Avatar
that T206 Guy that T206 Guy is offline
Steve
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Michigan
Posts: 156
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fetamore View Post
1981 Topps Fernando Valenzuela. Demand for a card has never topped this one.
Although the 1982 Topps Kent Hrbek is a close second.
What were they Selling for?

I remember 1986 Donruss Jose Canseco in Beckett for $150
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-12-2018, 06:10 AM
quitcrab quitcrab is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 550
Default

Maybe it's my age, but the 75 Rice ,Lynn and Brett where pretty hot rookies to chase. The Fernando Venezuela was too as mentioned earlier.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
One heckuva card to start off with on eBay..... Brian Van Horn Net54baseball Vintage (WWII & Older) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 17 01-08-2015 09:04 AM
FA: 2003 rookie auto LEBRON JAMES start at .99 cents - go nuts! cozmokramer Hockey / Basketball / Tennis Cards Forum 1 11-13-2014 10:09 PM
Not a bad card to start off your eBay career with..... Brian Van Horn Net54baseball Vintage (WWII & Older) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 13 02-03-2012 11:25 AM
Hey guys....how often does this phenomena happen to you ? tedzan Net54baseball Vintage (WWII & Older) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 10 11-23-2011 11:45 PM
How To Start A Vintage Card Business Archive Net54baseball Vintage (WWII & Older) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 11 10-11-2005 06:41 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:46 PM.


ebay GSB